Trading the London Session: Guide for Forex Traders

Ethereum Classic

Ethereum Classic is an open, decentralized, and permissionless public blockchain, that aims to fulfill the original promise of Ethereum, as a platform where smart contracts are free from third-party interference. ETC prioritizes trust-minimization, network security, and integrity. All network upgrades are non-contentious with the aim to fix critical issues or to add value with newly proposed features; never to create new tokens, or to bail out flawed smart contracts and their interest groups.
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Opened short on EUR/USD made profit £500. Copy of Live Forex | London Trading Session.

Opened short on EUUSD made profit £500. Copy of Live Forex | London Trading Session. submitted by Tin100 to Livetradingbroaadcast [link] [comments]

[100%] LONDON OPEN FOREX STRATEGY A TRIED AND TESTED FOREX METHOD COUPON

[100%] LONDON OPEN FOREX STRATEGY A TRIED AND TESTED FOREX METHOD COUPON submitted by Trendycz to udemyfreebies [link] [comments]

[100%] LONDON OPEN FOREX STRATEGY A TRIED AND TESTED FOREX METHOD COUPON

submitted by Trendycz to udemyfreebies [link] [comments]

[Udemy Free Coupon] 2020 LONDON OPEN FOREX STRATEGY | IDEAL CHRISTMAS PRESENT

https://www.yolocoupons.com/udemy-free-coupon-2020-london-open-forex-strategy-ideal-christmas-present/
submitted by AblePossession to udemyfreebies [link] [comments]

The Big Ben Forex Strategy – An Easy Forex Strategy For the London Market Opening

The Big Ben Forex Strategy – An Easy Forex Strategy For the London Market Opening submitted by Rufflenator to 3bitcoins [link] [comments]

The Big Ben Forex Strategy – An Easy Forex Strategy For the London Market Opening

The Big Ben Forex Strategy – An Easy Forex Strategy For the London Market Opening submitted by ososru to Bitcoin4free [link] [comments]

The Big Ben Forex Strategy – An Easy Forex Strategy For the London Market Opening

The Big Ben Forex Strategy – An Easy Forex Strategy For the London Market Opening submitted by Hellterskelt to bitcoin_is_dead [link] [comments]

If forex is 24/7 during the week why do 'opens' (such as Asia, London and the US) even matter?

Shit explodes when, for example, London hits 8am but they can trade whenever they want. Why is this a thing?
submitted by acrediblesauce to Forex [link] [comments]

2 Hour London Open Forex Trading System

2 Hour London Open Forex Trading System submitted by MiggyFX to MiggyFX [link] [comments]

EUR/USD

Does anyone here mainly trade EUUSD as their pair? If so do you start trading right at that London Session opening or wait for New York to open. And wait time do you wake up for it.
submitted by Chase_1819 to Forex [link] [comments]

Former investment bank FX trader: news trading and second order thinking

Former investment bank FX trader: news trading and second order thinking
Thanks to everyone who responded to the previous pieces on risk management. We ended up with nearly 2,000 upvotes and I'm delighted so many of you found it useful.
This time we're going to focus on a new area: reacting to and trading around news and fundamental developments.
A lot of people get this totally wrong and the main reason is that they trade the news at face value, without considering what the market had already priced in. If you've ever seen what you consider to be "good" or "better than forecast" news come out and yet been confused as the pair did nothing or moved in the opposite direction to expected, read on...
We are going to do this in two parts.
Part I
  • Introduction
  • Why use an economic calendar
  • How to read the calendar
  • Knowing what's priced in
  • Surveys
  • Rates decisions
  • First order thinking vs second order thinking

Introduction

Knowing how to use and benefit from the economic calendar is key for all traders - not just news traders.
In this chapter we are going to take a practical look at how to use the economic calendar. We are also going to look at how to interpret news using second order thinking.
The key concept is learning what has already been ‘priced in’ by the market so we can estimate how the market price might react to the new information.

Why use an economic calendar

The economic calendar contains all the scheduled economic releases for that day and week. Even if you purely trade based on technical analysis, you still must know what is in store.

https://preview.redd.it/20xdiq6gq4k51.png?width=1200&format=png&auto=webp&s=6cd47186db1039be7df4d7ad6782de36da48f1db
Why? Three main reasons.
Firstly, releases can help provide direction. They create trends. For example if GBPUSD has been fluctuating aimlessly within a range and suddenly the Bank of England starts raising rates you better believe the British Pound will start to move. Big news events often start long-term trends which you can trade around.
Secondly, a lot of the volatility occurs around these events. This is because these events give the market new information. Prior to a big scheduled release like the US Non Farm Payrolls you might find no one wants to take a big position. After it is released the market may move violently and potentially not just in a single direction - often prices may overshoot and come back down. Even without a trend this volatility provides lots of trading opportunities for the day trader.

https://preview.redd.it/u17iwbhiq4k51.png?width=1200&format=png&auto=webp&s=98ea8ed154c9468cb62037668c38e7387f2435af
Finally, these releases can change trends. Going into a huge release because of a technical indicator makes little sense. Everything could reverse and stop you out in a moment. You need to be aware of which events are likely to influence the positions you have on so you can decide whether to keep the positions or flatten exposure before the binary event for which you have no edge.
Most traders will therefore ‘scan’ the calendar for the week ahead, noting what the big events are and when they will occur. Then you can focus on each day at a time.

Reading the economic calendar


Most calendars show events cut by trading day. Helpfully they adjust the time of each release to your own timezone. For example we can see that the Bank of Japan Interest Rate decision is happening at 4am local time for this particular London-based trader.

https://preview.redd.it/lmx0q9qoq4k51.jpg?width=1200&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=c6e9e1533b1ba236e51296de8db3be55dfa78ba1

Note that some events do not happen at a specific time. Think of a Central Banker’s speech for example - this can go on for an hour. It is not like an economic statistic that gets released at a precise time. Clicking the finger emoji will open up additional information on each event.

Event importance

How do you define importance? Well, some events are always unimportant. With the greatest of respect to Italian farmers, nobody cares about mundane releases like Italian farm productivity figures.
Other events always seem to be important. That means, markets consistently react to them and prices move. Interest rate decisions are an example of consistently high importance events.
So the Medium and High can be thought of as guides to how much each event typically affects markets. They are not perfect guides, however, as different events are more or less important depending on the circumstances.
For example, imagine the UK economy was undergoing a consumer-led recovery. The Central Bank has said it would raise interest rates (making GBPUSD move higher) if they feel the consumer is confident.
Consumer confidence data would suddenly become an extremely important event. At other times, when the Central Bank has not said it is focused on the consumer, this release might be near irrelevant.

Knowing what's priced in

Next to each piece of economic data you can normally see three figures. Actual, Forecast, and Previous.
  • Actual refers to the number as it is released.
  • Forecast refers to the consensus estimate from analysts.
  • Previous is what it was last time.
We are going to look at this in a bit more detail later but what you care about is when numbers are better or worse than expected. Whether a number is ‘good’ or ‘bad’ really does not matter much. Yes, really.

Once you understand that markets move based on the news vs expectations, you will be less confused by price action around events

This is a common misunderstanding. Say everyone is expecting ‘great’ economic data and it comes out as ‘good’. Does the price go up?
You might think it should. After all, the economic data was good. However, everyone expected it to be great and it was just … good. The great release was ‘priced in’ by the market already. Most likely the price will be disappointed and go down.
By priced in we simply mean that the market expected it and already bought or sold. The information was already in the price before the announcement.
Incidentally the official forecasts can be pretty stale and might not accurately capture what active traders in the market expect. See the following example.

An example of pricing in

For example, let’s say the market is focused on the number of Tesla deliveries. Analysts think it’ll be 100,000 this quarter. But Elon Musk tweets something that hints he’s really, really, really looking forward to the analyst call. Tesla’s price ticks higher after the tweet as traders put on positions, reflecting the sentiment that Tesla is likely to massively beat the 100,000. (This example is not a real one - it just serves to illustrate the concept.)

Tesla deliveries are up hugely vs last quarter ... but they are disappointing vs market expectations ... what do you think will happen to the stock?

On the day it turns out Tesla hit 101,000. A better than the officially forecasted result - sure - but only marginally. Way below what readers of Musk's twitter account might have thought. Disappointed traders may sell their longs and close out the positions. The stock might go down on ‘good’ results because the market had priced in something even better. (This example is not a real one - it just serves to illustrate the concept.)

Surveys

It can be a little hard to know what the market really expects. Often the published forecasts are stale and do not reflect what actual traders and investors are looking for.
One of the most effective ways is a simple survey of investors. Something like a Twitter poll like this one from CNBC is freely available and not a bad barometer.
CNBC, Bloomberg and other business TV stations often have polls on their Twitter accounts that let you know what others are expecting

Interest rates decisions

We know that interest rates heavily affect currency prices.
For major interest rate decisions there’s a great tool on the CME’s website that you can use.

See the link for a demo

This gives you a % probability of each interest rate level, implied by traded prices in the bond futures market. For example, in the case above the market thinks there’s a 20% chance the Fed will cut rates to 75-100bp.
Obviously this is far more accurate than analyst estimates because it uses actual bond prices where market participants are directly taking risk and placing bets. It basically looks at what interest rate traders are willing to lend at just before/after the date of the central bank meeting to imply the odds that the market ascribes to a change on that date.
Always try to estimate what the market has priced in. That way you have some context for whether the release really was better or worse than expected.

Second order thinking

You have to know what the market expects to try and guess how it’ll react. This is referred to by Howard Marks of Oaktree as second-level thinking. His explanation is so clear I am going to quote extensively.
It really is hard to improve on this clarity of thought:
First-level thinking is simplistic and superficial, and just about everyone can do it (a bad sign for anything involving an attempt at superiority). All the first-level thinker needs is an opinion about the future, as in “The outlook for the company is favorable, meaning the stock will go up.” Second-level thinking is deep, complex and convoluted.
Howard Marks
He explains first-level thinking:
The first-level thinker simply looks for the highest quality company, the best product, the fastest earnings growth or the lowest p/e ratio. He’s ignorant of the very existence of a second level at which to think, and of the need to pursue it.
Howard Marks
The above describes the guy who sees a 101,000 result and buys Tesla stock because - hey, this beat expectations. Marks goes on to describe second-level thinking:
The second-level thinker goes through a much more complex process when thinking about buying an asset. Is it good? Do others think it’s as good as I think it is? Is it really as good as I think it is? Is it as good as others think it is? Is it as good as others think others think it is? How will it change? How do others think it will change? How is it priced given: its current condition; how do I think its conditions will change; how others think it will change; and how others think others think it will change? And that’s just the beginning. No, this isn’t easy.
Howard Marks
In this version of events you are always thinking about the market’s response to Tesla results.
What do you think they’ll announce? What has the market priced in? Is Musk reliable? Are the people who bought because of his tweet likely to hold on if he disappoints or exit immediately? If it goes up at which price will they take profit? How big a number is now considered ‘wow’ by the market?
As Marks says: not easy. However, you need to start getting into the habit of thinking like this if you want to beat the market. You can make gameplans in advance for various scenarios.
Here are some examples from Marks to illustrate the difference between first order and second order thinking.

Some further examples
Trying to react fast to headlines is impossible in today’s market of ultra fast computers. You will never win on speed. Therefore you have to out-think the average participant.

Coming up in part II

Now that we have a basic understanding of concepts such as expectations and what the market has priced in, we can look at some interesting trading techniques and tools.
Part II
  • Preparing for quantitative and qualitative releases
  • Data surprise index
  • Using recent events to predict future reactions
  • Buy the rumour, sell the fact
  • The trimming position effect
  • Reversals
  • Some key FX releases
Hope you enjoyed this note. As always, please reply with any questions/feedback - it is fun to hear from you.
***
Disclaimer:This content is not investment advice and you should not place any reliance on it. The views expressed are the author's own and should not be attributed to any other person, including their employer.
submitted by getmrmarket to Forex [link] [comments]

H1 Backtest of ParallaxFX's BBStoch system

Disclaimer: None of this is financial advice. I have no idea what I'm doing. Please do your own research or you will certainly lose money. I'm not a statistician, data scientist, well-seasoned trader, or anything else that would qualify me to make statements such as the below with any weight behind them. Take them for the incoherent ramblings that they are.
TL;DR at the bottom for those not interested in the details.
This is a bit of a novel, sorry about that. It was mostly for getting my own thoughts organized, but if even one person reads the whole thing I will feel incredibly accomplished.

Background

For those of you not familiar, please see the various threads on this trading system here. I can't take credit for this system, all glory goes to ParallaxFX!
I wanted to see how effective this system was at H1 for a couple of reasons: 1) My current broker is TD Ameritrade - their Forex minimum is a mini lot, and I don't feel comfortable enough yet with the risk to trade mini lots on the higher timeframes(i.e. wider pip swings) that ParallaxFX's system uses, so I wanted to see if I could scale it down. 2) I'm fairly impatient, so I don't like to wait days and days with my capital tied up just to see if a trade is going to win or lose.
This does mean it requires more active attention since you are checking for setups once an hour instead of once a day or every 4-6 hours, but the upside is that you trade more often this way so you end up winning or losing faster and moving onto the next trade. Spread does eat more of the trade this way, but I'll cover this in my data below - it ends up not being a problem.
I looked at data from 6/11 to 7/3 on all pairs with a reasonable spread(pairs listed at bottom above the TL;DR). So this represents about 3-4 weeks' worth of trading. I used mark(mid) price charts. Spreadsheet link is below for anyone that's interested.

System Details

I'm pretty much using ParallaxFX's system textbook, but since there are a few options in his writeups, I'll include all the discretionary points here:

And now for the fun. Results!

As you can see, a higher target ended up with higher profit despite a much lower winrate. This is partially just how things work out with profit targets in general, but there's an additional point to consider in our case: the spread. Since we are trading on a lower timeframe, there is less overall price movement and thus the spread takes up a much larger percentage of the trade than it would if you were trading H4, Daily or Weekly charts. You can see exactly how much it accounts for each trade in my spreadsheet if you're interested. TDA does not have the best spreads, so you could probably improve these results with another broker.
EDIT: I grabbed typical spreads from other brokers, and turns out while TDA is pretty competitive on majors, their minors/crosses are awful! IG beats them by 20-40% and Oanda beats them 30-60%! Using IG spreads for calculations increased profits considerably (another 5% on top) and Oanda spreads increased profits massively (another 15%!). Definitely going to be considering another broker than TDA for this strategy. Plus that'll allow me to trade micro-lots, so I can be more granular(and thus accurate) with my position sizing and compounding.

A Note on Spread

As you can see in the data, there were scenarios where the spread was 80% of the overall size of the trade(the size of the confirmation candle that you draw your fibonacci retracements over), which would obviously cut heavily into your profits.
Removing any trades where the spread is more than 50% of the trade width improved profits slightly without removing many trades, but this is almost certainly just coincidence on a small sample size. Going below 40% and even down to 30% starts to cut out a lot of trades for the less-common pairs, but doesn't actually change overall profits at all(~1% either way).
However, digging all the way down to 25% starts to really make some movement. Profit at the -161.8% TP level jumps up to 37.94% if you filter out anything with a spread that is more than 25% of the trade width! And this even keeps the sample size fairly large at 187 total trades.
You can get your profits all the way up to 48.43% at the -161.8% TP level if you filter all the way down to only trades where spread is less than 15% of the trade width, however your sample size gets much smaller at that point(108 trades) so I'm not sure I would trust that as being accurate in the long term.
Overall based on this data, I'm going to only take trades where the spread is less than 25% of the trade width. This may bias my trades more towards the majors, which would mean a lot more correlated trades as well(more on correlation below), but I think it is a reasonable precaution regardless.

Time of Day

Time of day had an interesting effect on trades. In a totally predictable fashion, a vast majority of setups occurred during the London and New York sessions: 5am-12pm Eastern. However, there was one outlier where there were many setups on the 11PM bar - and the winrate was about the same as the big hours in the London session. No idea why this hour in particular - anyone have any insight? That's smack in the middle of the Tokyo/Sydney overlap, not at the open or close of either.
On many of the hour slices I have a feeling I'm just dealing with small number statistics here since I didn't have a lot of data when breaking it down by individual hours. But here it is anyway - for all TP levels, these three things showed up(all in Eastern time):
I don't have any reason to think these timeframes would maintain this behavior over the long term. They're almost certainly meaningless. EDIT: When you de-dup highly correlated trades, the number of trades in these timeframes really drops, so from this data there is no reason to think these timeframes would be any different than any others in terms of winrate.
That being said, these time frames work out for me pretty well because I typically sleep 12am-7am Eastern time. So I automatically avoid the 5am-6am timeframe, and I'm awake for the majority of this system's setups.

Moving stops up to breakeven

This section goes against everything I know and have ever heard about trade management. Please someone find something wrong with my data. I'd love for someone to check my formulas, but I realize that's a pretty insane time commitment to ask of a bunch of strangers.
Anyways. What I found was that for these trades moving stops up...basically at all...actually reduced the overall profitability.
One of the data points I collected while charting was where the price retraced back to after hitting a certain milestone. i.e. once the price hit the -61.8% profit level, how far back did it retrace before hitting the -100% profit level(if at all)? And same goes for the -100% profit level - how far back did it retrace before hitting the -161.8% profit level(if at all)?
Well, some complex excel formulas later and here's what the results appear to be. Emphasis on appears because I honestly don't believe it. I must have done something wrong here, but I've gone over it a hundred times and I can't find anything out of place.
Now, you might think exactly what I did when looking at these numbers: oof, the spread killed us there right? Because even when you move your SL to 0%, you still end up paying the spread, so it's not truly "breakeven". And because we are trading on a lower timeframe, the spread can be pretty hefty right?
Well even when I manually modified the data so that the spread wasn't subtracted(i.e. "Breakeven" was truly +/- 0), things don't look a whole lot better, and still way worse than the passive trade management method of leaving your stops in place and letting it run. And that isn't even a realistic scenario because to adjust out the spread you'd have to move your stoploss inside the candle edge by at least the spread amount, meaning it would almost certainly be triggered more often than in the data I collected(which was purely based on the fib levels and mark price). Regardless, here are the numbers for that scenario:
From a literal standpoint, what I see behind this behavior is that 44 of the 69 breakeven trades(65%!) ended up being profitable to -100% after retracing deeply(but not to the original SL level), which greatly helped offset the purely losing trades better than the partial profit taken at -61.8%. And 36 went all the way back to -161.8% after a deep retracement without hitting the original SL. Anyone have any insight into this? Is this a problem with just not enough data? It seems like enough trades that a pattern should emerge, but again I'm no expert.
I also briefly looked at moving stops to other lower levels (78.6%, 61.8%, 50%, 38.2%, 23.6%), but that didn't improve things any. No hard data to share as I only took a quick look - and I still might have done something wrong overall.
The data is there to infer other strategies if anyone would like to dig in deep(more explanation on the spreadsheet below). I didn't do other combinations because the formulas got pretty complicated and I had already answered all the questions I was looking to answer.

2-Candle vs Confirmation Candle Stops

Another interesting point is that the original system has the SL level(for stop entries) just at the outer edge of the 2-candle pattern that makes up the system. Out of pure laziness, I set up my stops just based on the confirmation candle. And as it turns out, that is much a much better way to go about it.
Of the 60 purely losing trades, only 9 of them(15%) would go on to be winners with stops on the 2-candle formation. Certainly not enough to justify the extra loss and/or reduced profits you are exposing yourself to in every single other trade by setting a wider SL.
Oddly, in every single scenario where the wider stop did save the trade, it ended up going all the way to the -161.8% profit level. Still, not nearly worth it.

Correlated Trades

As I've said many times now, I'm really not qualified to be doing an analysis like this. This section in particular.
Looking at shared currency among the pairs traded, 74 of the trades are correlated. Quite a large group, but it makes sense considering the sort of moves we're looking for with this system.
This means you are opening yourself up to more risk if you were to trade on every signal since you are technically trading with the same underlying sentiment on each different pair. For example, GBP/USD and AUD/USD moving together almost certainly means it's due to USD moving both pairs, rather than GBP and AUD both moving the same size and direction coincidentally at the same time. So if you were to trade both signals, you would very likely win or lose both trades - meaning you are actually risking double what you'd normally risk(unless you halve both positions which can be a good option, and is discussed in ParallaxFX's posts and in various other places that go over pair correlation. I won't go into detail about those strategies here).
Interestingly though, 17 of those apparently correlated trades ended up with different wins/losses.
Also, looking only at trades that were correlated, winrate is 83%/70%/55% (for the three TP levels).
Does this give some indication that the same signal on multiple pairs means the signal is stronger? That there's some strong underlying sentiment driving it? Or is it just a matter of too small a sample size? The winrate isn't really much higher than the overall winrates, so that makes me doubt it is statistically significant.
One more funny tidbit: EUCAD netted the lowest overall winrate: 30% to even the -61.8% TP level on 10 trades. Seems like that is just a coincidence and not enough data, but dang that's a sucky losing streak.
EDIT: WOW I spent some time removing correlated trades manually and it changed the results quite a bit. Some thoughts on this below the results. These numbers also include the other "What I will trade" filters. I added a new worksheet to my data to show what I ended up picking.
To do this, I removed correlated trades - typically by choosing those whose spread had a lower % of the trade width since that's objective and something I can see ahead of time. Obviously I'd like to only keep the winning trades, but I won't know that during the trade. This did reduce the overall sample size down to a level that I wouldn't otherwise consider to be big enough, but since the results are generally consistent with the overall dataset, I'm not going to worry about it too much.
I may also use more discretionary methods(support/resistance, quality of indecision/confirmation candles, news/sentiment for the pairs involved, etc) to filter out correlated trades in the future. But as I've said before I'm going for a pretty mechanical system.
This brought the 3 TP levels and even the breakeven strategies much closer together in overall profit. It muted the profit from the high R:R strategies and boosted the profit from the low R:R strategies. This tells me pair correlation was skewing my data quite a bit, so I'm glad I dug in a little deeper. Fortunately my original conclusion to use the -161.8 TP level with static stops is still the winner by a good bit, so it doesn't end up changing my actions.
There were a few times where MANY (6-8) correlated pairs all came up at the same time, so it'd be a crapshoot to an extent. And the data showed this - often then won/lost together, but sometimes they did not. As an arbitrary rule, the more correlations, the more trades I did end up taking(and thus risking). For example if there were 3-5 correlations, I might take the 2 "best" trades given my criteria above. 5+ setups and I might take the best 3 trades, even if the pairs are somewhat correlated.
I have no true data to back this up, but to illustrate using one example: if AUD/JPY, AUD/USD, CAD/JPY, USD/CAD all set up at the same time (as they did, along with a few other pairs on 6/19/20 9:00 AM), can you really say that those are all the same underlying movement? There are correlations between the different correlations, and trying to filter for that seems rough. Although maybe this is a known thing, I'm still pretty green to Forex - someone please enlighten me if so! I might have to look into this more statistically, but it would be pretty complex to analyze quantitatively, so for now I'm going with my gut and just taking a few of the "best" trades out of the handful.
Overall, I'm really glad I went further on this. The boosting of the B/E strategies makes me trust my calculations on those more since they aren't so far from the passive management like they were with the raw data, and that really had me wondering what I did wrong.

What I will trade

Putting all this together, I am going to attempt to trade the following(demo for a bit to make sure I have the hang of it, then for keeps):
Looking at the data for these rules, test results are:
I'll be sure to let everyone know how it goes!

Other Technical Details

Raw Data

Here's the spreadsheet for anyone that'd like it. (EDIT: Updated some of the setups from the last few days that have fully played out now. I also noticed a few typos, but nothing major that would change the overall outcomes. Regardless, I am currently reviewing every trade to ensure they are accurate.UPDATE: Finally all done. Very few corrections, no change to results.)
I have some explanatory notes below to help everyone else understand the spiraled labyrinth of a mind that put the spreadsheet together.

Insanely detailed spreadsheet notes

For you real nerds out there. Here's an explanation of what each column means:

Pairs

  1. AUD/CAD
  2. AUD/CHF
  3. AUD/JPY
  4. AUD/NZD
  5. AUD/USD
  6. CAD/CHF
  7. CAD/JPY
  8. CHF/JPY
  9. EUAUD
  10. EUCAD
  11. EUCHF
  12. EUGBP
  13. EUJPY
  14. EUNZD
  15. EUUSD
  16. GBP/AUD
  17. GBP/CAD
  18. GBP/CHF
  19. GBP/JPY
  20. GBP/NZD
  21. GBP/USD
  22. NZD/CAD
  23. NZD/CHF
  24. NZD/JPY
  25. NZD/USD
  26. USD/CAD
  27. USD/CHF
  28. USD/JPY

TL;DR

Based on the reasonable rules I discovered in this backtest:

Demo Trading Results

Since this post, I started demo trading this system assuming a 5k capital base and risking ~1% per trade. I've added the details to my spreadsheet for anyone interested. The results are pretty similar to the backtest when you consider real-life conditions/timing are a bit different. I missed some trades due to life(work, out of the house, etc), so that brought my total # of trades and thus overall profit down, but the winrate is nearly identical. I also closed a few trades early due to various reasons(not liking the price action, seeing support/resistance emerge, etc).
A quick note is that TD's paper trade system fills at the mid price for both stop and limit orders, so I had to subtract the spread from the raw trade values to get the true profit/loss amount for each trade.
I'm heading out of town next week, then after that it'll be time to take this sucker live!

Live Trading Results

I started live-trading this system on 8/10, and almost immediately had a string of losses much longer than either my backtest or demo period. Murphy's law huh? Anyways, that has me spooked so I'm doing a longer backtest before I start risking more real money. It's going to take me a little while due to the volume of trades, but I'll likely make a new post once I feel comfortable with that and start live trading again.
submitted by ForexBorex to Forex [link] [comments]

Open markets hours indicator for futures (CME, CBOT, CBOE, etc...)

Looking for something similar to this but for futures markets CME, CBOT, CBOE
Something in Outlook via iCal would be even better as well.
Basically I'm looking for a easy, interractive way to know when market opens, set alarms for it and in which phase we are (pre-market, open session, globex, holidays)
submitted by Poilaucul to Daytrading [link] [comments]

Dax Trade London Session

Dax Trade London Session
Quick trade during London open session. The market was going up, I waited for a pullback and boom! The day is done.
https://preview.redd.it/vjtxp3ta8xp51.png?width=1200&format=png&auto=webp&s=a869c254e067f3af0decc08af82bd95163bb116b
Learn how I do it. Free trading course here: www.livingfromtrading.com


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submitted by livingfromtrading to u/livingfromtrading [link] [comments]

3 Biggest Mistakes I Made When I Was Learning to Trade Forex

When I first learnt to trade, I had no clue what I was getting myself into. As I was searching the internet for the wide range of forex material available, I noticed two main things. The first one was 'Forex is the hardest easiest money you will make' and that 'Over 90% of Forex traders fail.'
Well, now, as I've been trading forex for some time now and mentoring people how to trade, I realised the 3 biggest mistakes I made while learning to trade.

1. Overtrading
I would jump on the charts at the London open, do my analysis on 6-8+ pairs and place multiple trades at once. This happened every time I jumped on the charts, I ALWAYS thought there was a trade to be taken. I remember feeling like a real professional at the time, watching my multiple positions tick up into profit but eventually hitting my SL and closing me out, losing 2-3% a night.
Obviously just starting out, my trading psychology wasn't the best and this often resulted in emotional trading. I would open up bigger positions to make up for my losses, which often resulted in even greater losses. One trade, I lost 2k in a matter of minutes which was 40% of my account at the time.
Do I regret any of this? Absolutely not. This helped me to build the current mindset that I have today. When these BIG mistakes occur, you have to remember that you are in this for the long haul. I would tell myself that 2k will be nothing when I am trading a 100k account in the future. LEARN from your mistakes, do not make them again, and then move on.
I found journaling and back testing EVERY trade I took to greatly help this problem of overtrading as the more trades I took, the longer I would be spending on the weekends studying all my trades.

2. Not understanding the importance of RR and risk management
I didn't understand how important risk reward ratios were when I first started trading. My mentor would always tell me not to take any trades that were less than a 1:2.5 RR but I struggled to find these trades as I was always just taking random trades when I hopped on the charts.
Once I finally understood, through experience, that trading is a game of probabilities and to have an edge over the market and therefore gradually grow your account, you need to ensure you are taking trades with a good RR. I would be watching the charts and when price was coming close to my entry price, I would execute a buy/sell, not realising that the few pip difference made a massive difference to my RR. I found the use of pending orders to help this issue greatly as it removed my fear of missing a trade and executing at a worst price.

3. Trading multiple pairs
As I mentioned before, I would hop on the charts and analyse 6-8 pairs to see if there were any trades to take. If no trades grabbed my attention, I would continue to skim all 6-8 pairs until I forced a trade to come to my attention.
Trading multiple pairs was terrible for my trading at the beginning. I always assumed that all pairs have the same qualities and move the same but how wrong I was. Reducing the number of pairs that I traded to only 1-2 helped my trading greatly. You notice certain qualities that each individual trade has, such as EURUSD not pulling back as much as GBPJPY, for example. You learn the language of the pair and how it may react at certain S/R or to certain news.

What are you currently struggling with?
submitted by ryan_irani to Forex [link] [comments]

BTM fund is a new generation hybrid investment fund created with the participation of professionals with many years of experience in the stock market, forex, cryptocurrency market and traditional investment segment.

BTM fund is a new generation hybrid investment fund created with the participation of professionals with many years of experience in the stock market, forex, cryptocurrency market and traditional investment segment.
BTM fund is a new generation hybrid investment fund created with the participation of professionals with many years of experience in the stock market, forex, cryptocurrency market and traditional investment segment. The fund is headquartered in London. There are also representative offices in Moscow and Kiev, it is planned to open representative offices in Istanbul, New York, Dubai, Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan.
Amid the impending global economic crisis, nowhere in the world is there a "safe haven" for your investment capital. All stock indices are at their historical highs, it is obvious that a financial bubble is blowing up, which can burst at any moment.
The astronomical figures of the national debt of the United States and other developed and developing economies lead to soft monetary policy, to the inclusion of the printing press against the background of the absence of attractive investment projects that can create added value. Flexible solutions of the BTM hybrid investment fund allow you to effectively manage your money. We have 8 key investment areas that will satisfy the requirements of the most demanding investor.
The key feature of our fund is instant diversification of investment programs! "Let the profits flow and cut the losses!" Our professionals keep their finger on the pulse of the financial market around the clock. Today we surf the waves of the hype of cryptocurrency, blockchain and defi projects, and tomorrow we invest the earned money in a real highly profitable business or in the shares of top world companies, or go into gold and cash.
Join our foundation today to successfully weather the financial storm tomorrow! When the wind of financial changes blows away any roof of a financial institution, you will confidently stand on the solid foundation of the BTM fund! Save and increase
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submitted by btmfoundation to u/btmfoundation [link] [comments]

Moving to London from Canada (30y/o) and looking for the basics: bank account, phone plan, credit card, etc.

Greetings from /PersonalFinanceCanada !
I am looking to move to the UK in the coming months to live with my partner who is working in London. I am able to telework/remote work from the UK with my current Canadian job that pays in Canadian dollars. I have a work Visa for the UK, but am not looking just yet. The pay is good enough, even with the low dollar, high pound, to get by in London.
I am hoping some of you can offer some words of wisdom to a financially prudent individual with little knowledge of the UK system. I am looking for a good cellphone plan (I already own a phone, just just a month-by-month or 1-year contract max), an easy bank to open that ideally offers a credit card that I can get with no UK-credit history (I have great Canadian credit history), and any other tips that may aid me in this move.
So, for example, any promos from banks or credit cards that are work looking into?
I also understand that there are more bills in the UK (property tax, water, heat, electricity, etc.) and many cannot be paid by credit card, but through a current/checking account. How does one best set up their finances for this?
Since I'm paid in CAD$ not GBP, I will be transffering using TransferWise the basic amounts I need to get by in London for now, and perhaps using a no fee FOREX credit card for daily purchases.
Thank you all!
BONUS Q: anyone with knowledge of taxation across Canada-UK, please share. Given I'll be teleworking and paid in CAD$, the UK gov't wont even necessarily know I'm living there, but want to make sure I dont have to pay 2x the tax. :S
submitted by personalfinance21 to UKPersonalFinance [link] [comments]

MT5 international foreign exchange trading platform, recently the foreign exchange gold market is also on the rise

What is the foreign exchange market?Foreign exchange market (FOREx market) refers to the place or network where foreign exchange transactions take place.Mainly between local currency and foreign currency, foreign exchange transactions between different currencies.The foreign exchange market can be divided into two parts, namely the inter-bank foreign exchange market and the retail foreign exchange market.Interbank foreign exchange market can also be acquired as an inter-bank wholesale foreign exchange market, which is the uppermost market in foreign exchange transactions and the market for foreign exchange transactions among Banks, forming a relatively centralized foreign exchange market.In the interbank market, there is no such thing as margin trading.Retail forex market refers to the market between forex trading institutions and their clients. The most basic class in this market is individual traders, characterized by wide and dispersed distribution.
The modern international foreign exchange market is generally distributed in major cities in the world, such as London, New York, Paris, Vertical, Zurich, Wellington, Tokyo, Singapore, Hong Kong and other world-famous financial centers and foreign exchange centers. The interconnections and influence of these centers form a foreign exchange network covering the whole world.Due to time zones and time differences, such a horizontal global market is almost always open and close one after another, forming a circular 24-hour foreign exchange market.In the global market, the UK, the US, Singapore, Hong Kong and Japan accounted for 77% of the global forex trading volume.At present, China's foreign exchange market is a market system centered on the inter-bank market.
In the foreign exchange market, the exchange rate fluctuation refers to the exchange rate of changing currencies. The change in exchange rate is the decrease in the value of one currency and the increase in the value of another currency.A currency does not become a waste of paper, or even a dwindling currency, but it will always represent a certain value, unless the abolition of the currency is declared.You've had negative interest rates, you've had a plunge in stocks, you've had zero futures, you've had real estate, you've had a question mark as an investment hedge, and in many cases rents may not be worth the mortgage index.For domestic investors, the currency market is the most "clean" speculative market with little risk but great opportunity.
Investors need not bother in the performance of each stock, futures long-short don't have to worry about both sides of the insider trading, daily turnover of huge, make any also does not have the dealer's courage, soros, buffett can learn about the information, as well as ordinary investors can learn, global investors and speculators are in the same time looking at the same price and graphics, several thousands of marketmakers network trading platform and the world millions of investors and speculators have together.
submitted by kelly19981001 to investing [link] [comments]

forex waluty

The top ten most active traders, that The Currency market largely deals in You will first need to open an account with an agent. Introduction to the Forex market The trading of currencies. Currency projections help mitigating the That is the Significant markets located in The Rates are extremely tight for your You will find additional monies which are Tokyo, London and U.S are started at several hours. Nearly two thirds of those trading which may be followed by currency projections happens throughout the convergence of New York market opening and European markets are working. Retailers to deal with. The continuous movements in currency projections keep the Forex market a fast global currency market that crushes all competition amongst financial markets. forex expert advisor
Traded but are done in scale. The highest traded money will be now U.S. Dollar. There are certain misconceptions regarding Forex market. Predict the currency projections nicely, do almost three quarters of total dealing. They are called the inter-bank market and composed of international banks. Trading activities determined by currency projections performed by them supply the market with bid and ask prices. Risk element. The currency projections demonstrate that an exchange is done between parties. During a period of time after foreign exchange projections, both parties switch one currency. forex trading software
The inverse as money projections after the interval runs out. Organizations; dominant banks and companies guarantee growth and preserve their popularity. Marketplace where all of the monies are traded. The marketplace is a mix of contrasting markets, and each of which has their own set of principles and regulations. As Forex depends on currency projections, it will become impossible to exchange correctly due to this difference in time zones. Proper currency projections help monetary Contrary to popular belief There's no Forex Trading best forex brokers
submitted by elzajohn265 to u/elzajohn265 [link] [comments]

forexlive

The top ten most active dealers, who The Currency market largely deals in You will need to start an account with a broker. The trading of global currencies. Depending on money projections, the currencies that are traded the many are Canadian Dollar, Australian Dollar, U.S. Dollar, Pound Sterling, Swiss Franc, Euro and Yen. Currency projections assist mitigating the That is the major markets situated in The prices are really tight for its There are other currencies which are also Tokyo, London and U.S are opened at different hours. Two thirds occurs throughout the convergence of New York market opening and markets are working.Retailers to cope with. The movements in currency projections keep the Forex market a quick paced international currency exchange which transports all competition amongst financial markets. top forex brokers
Traded but are performed in smaller scale. The highest traded money will be U.S. Dollar. There are misconceptions concerning Forex market. Predict the money projections nicely, do almost 3 quarters of total coping. They composed of banks and are called the marketplace. Trading activities depending on money projections provide the marketplace with bid and ask prices. Risk factor. The money projections demonstrate that an exchange is done between parties. Throughout a period of time following currency projections, both the parties switch one currency. The inverse as money projections following the interval runs out. forex bonus
Organizations; dominant banks and companies guarantee growth and keep their own popularity. Central market where the currencies are traded. The current marketplace is a mixture of many markets, each of which has their own set of regulations and principles. As Forex depends on currency projections, it becomes impossible to exchange due to this difference in time zones. Appropriate currency projections help monetary Contrary to popular belief there is no Forex Trading To start trading the Forex market online forex trading tips
submitted by elzajohn265 to u/elzajohn265 [link] [comments]

A random guide for scalping - Part V - Understanding Intraday Liquidity

Hi there guys,
Welcome back to my weekly rants. Decided to add some info that should be pretty useful to your daily trading, thanks to the comments of u/Neokill1 and u/indridcold91.
If you have not read the rest of the series, I recommend you take your time and read those before continuing with this piece (check my user activity and scroll down...)
This rant is based on this little comment I posted on the last post:
Price moves because of the imbalance between buying and selling. This happens all the time. Price move where liquidity is, and that seeking of liquidity makes the price to go up and down.
Why price extends on a particular direction? Because longer term players decide it.
So the idea behind what I'm writing about is to follow that longer-term trend, taking advantage of a counter-trend wave that is looking for intra-day liquidity. If I'm bullish on the week, I want to pair my buying with intra-day selling. Because I expect longer-term traders to push price by buying massively. And instead of riding a big wave, I want to ride that push and get out before it retraces.
And also answers to this: why for example would it make sense to draw support/resistance lines on a EUUSD chart? Why would anyone "support" the price of a spread? What are you predicting to happen by drawing those lines, that someone will exchange their currency there simply because it's the same price they exchanged it for in the past and that number is special to them?
A good question that deserves an answer
That question is a pretty good one, and one any trader worth of that name should ask himself why. Why price reacts the way it does? Why price behaves in predetermined ways? Why if I draw a line or area on specific candle places, I expect the price to react?
And the answer is simple and at the same time kinda complicated and fascinating. Why price rallies and rallies andd rallies and then suddenly it stops at a point ,and reverses? . The answer is , because there are sellers at that point. There is liquidity there. There is people at that point that decided it was worth to sell enough to reverse that rally.
All the market does is to put together buyers and sellers. If you want to buy something at some price, someone must agree with you. If no ones agrees, then you will have to offer more. When buyers and sellers agree on similar terms, price is stable. Buying and selling happens on a tight range, because both consider that particular price range worth.
But then, perhaps, someone wants to buy big. And there are not enough sellers. This big boy will dry the available liquidity , and it is hungry for more. So price will move from a balanced state to an imbalanced state. This imbalance in volume between buyers and sellers will cause the price to move up, taking all available liquidity till the monster is satiated. Then the exhaustion of bids, or buying, will cause the price to reverse to a point where buying interest is back.
The same applies for selling activity. The main take away you should get from this is simply that the market keeps moving from balance to imbalance to balance to imbalance all the time. And the points where the big bois deploy this activity of buying , of selling, of protecting levels, of slowly entering the markets, are mostly predetermined. Surprised? Most of the institutional activity happens at : 00 ,20, 50 and 80 levels.
So why drawing a line makes sense? It makes sense because when price stalls at some point, is because sellers or buyers stepped in and stopped the movement. Its a level where something interesting is happening.
It's a level where liquidity was present, and the question is, what is going to happen the next time price touches the area? Is someone stepping in to buy or sell at this point? Or perharps the first touch dried the liquidity, and there is nothing preventing price from going up again??
Lets see a real example of a trade I took today on GBPUSD, where I analyze step by step the balance and imbalance of the market liquidity in real time at those levels. The only way to see this is usingfutures. Because forex is a decentralized market and blah blah blah, and futures are centralized so you can see the volume, the limit orders through the DOM and blah blah blah....
So first things first, read well this articule : https://optimusfutures.com/tradeblog/archives/order-flow-trading
Understand well what is said there. Take it easy. Take your time. And then come back to me.
If you have followed my work, you know how I like to ride the market. I want a retracement on the most liquid moment in the market - the NY-London Overlap, and I need a daily BIAS on the pair.
For today, I'm bullish on the GBPUSD.
So lets check the pics.
https://imgur.com/a/kgev9lT
The areas you see marked on the 30 min charts are based on the price relationships that happened last Friday. As you can see, those areas are always in a place where price stalled, retraced, pushed through,came back to the area and reacted in some way. Are those black magic? Why price reacts so smoothly today on them? Ah you Criptochihuahua, this is 20/20 insight, you are lying....
Those points are marked before today's open, simply because of the price relationship I described earlier. And if you remember the earlier rant, price stalls in there because sellers or buyers were present.
So I would expect that the levels are still interesting, and we should be watching carefully how price reacts in real time.
Now, today I got at 1.2680 and got out at 1.2725. Let's check the 2nd pic, keep following the narrative with your own charts.
What you are seeing is the first touch at the big figure with the total volume chart, and the bid/ask order flow chart. You can see how the price is pulled toward that level through the exhaustion of offers being filled. You can see how exactly they are depleted at 15:51. Why? Because at the next min, you can see how there are no offers being filled, compared to the bids.
Remember, when offers are getting filled , price pulls up. When the bids are predominantly being filled, price is pulled down.
And also take a look on the volume. This is key. If an imbalance is to happen, is because there should be a huge difference between bids and asks. Good volume on such a level, good sign. Price hugging the level without good volume, the level will most likely be broken.
Look at the next pic. See the price behavior in combination with the volume? Price is hugging the level on low volume. Great signal. That means the level is not that greatly defended, at this point.
What are we looking for? We are looking for the bids to be exhausted at our next level with a good volume reaction. Watch what happens.
Next pic is our retracement , and we are watching carefully. And look at that beauty. Do you see the volume? Do you see the bids exhaustion? Do you see how the market orders are getting absorbed by the limit orders at that point? Someone does not want the price to go down. Price jumps as a result. It does not huge the level. Do you see? I'm all in, I want to take part of this trade.
But wait, there is more.... look at the next pic, because you yet have another opportunity to get into this train.... at 17:23.. Even a bigger reaction, while on the other side.... we got more hugging...
No more pics for today. You see what happens next. The level gets broken and price rallies to take the previous day high. Trade was a success.
So I hope this added some value, and explained why drawing lines is useful, and how levels are indeed defended.
P.S - I lied: Extra Pic, you got a VWAP chart with Standard Deviations. You can see how the pullback nicely fits in our long framework as well and adds confluence to the trade. Research about this :)
submitted by Cryptochihuahua to Forex [link] [comments]

DAX Trading the open like a boss

Here's a short video about how to trade Indices Futures during the open of the markets.
https://www.livingfromtrading.com/blog/dax-trading-the-london-open/
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submitted by livingfromtrading to u/livingfromtrading [link] [comments]

Super Easy London Breakout Strategy (Scalping Forex Market ... How To Trade The London Breakout Forex Trading Strategy ... Forex Strategy: London Open Breakout - YouTube Forex London Open Breakout Strategy 3 - The LOB System ... Nenad Kerkez: London Open Forex System - YouTube

The London opening range breakout strategy for Forex. Simple and profitable Forex breakout strategy for London session. Morning trading in 10 minutes a day! London Open Scalping Forex Trading Strategy is a combination of Metatrader 4 (MT4) indicator(s) and template. The essence of this forex system is to transform the accumulated history data and trading signals. LONDON OPEN TRADE STRATEGY (LOTS) is a 100%, rules-based Forex trading setup strategy created by Darko Ali and Vic Noble to help Forex traders locate and enter trades in a pre-defined way. This unique yet simple trading system offers 100% objectivity in how a trade is validated, with rules for entry and stops, and strict guidelines for trade ... The London open breakout strategy is one of the very well known short term or intraday scalping strategy. As the name suggests, the London Open breakout strategy works on the principle of prices breaking out during the London session open which is preceded by the Asian trading session. This forex trading system is called the 2 hour london open forex trading system. It is a simple price action trading system, designed to capture the breakout of the high and low of the 2nd hour candlestick after the London forex market opens. Currency Pairs: GBPUSD, GBPJPY, GBPCHF. Timeframe: 1 hour. Indicator: Sessions (shows you the beginning and end of asian, london and new york forex ...

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Super Easy London Breakout Strategy (Scalping Forex Market ...

Watch this lesson to discover an effective scalping trading strategy that could help you become more successful when trading the Forex market. In this video ... Date of issue: 04 November 2015. Speaker: Nenad Kerkez. One of the greatest advantages of the FX market is that it is open 24 hours a day. London defines the... Forex Strategy: London Open Breakout http://www.LearnForexLive.com Ready To Get Serious Results From Your Trading? Get The Tools & Trading Systems You Need To Start Making Consistent, Bankable PROFITS! We helped Struggling T... London Breakout Forex Trading Strategy. http://www.financial-spread-betting.com/course/technical-analysis.html PLEASE LIKE AND SHARE THIS VIDEO SO WE CAN DO ...

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